A ‘green revolution’ that may save Filipino coconut farmers

Content In agroforestry, farmers plant more than one type of crop and in different heights – a concept called multi-storey cropping. Like in the Marjes’ farm, you’ll find coconut trees or tall fruit trees watching over everything.
In lower levels are shorter fruit trees, coffee or cacao trees, and herbal plants. On the ground are pineapples, tuber and root crops like cassava, potato, and peanut.
Author Rappler
Contributor Rappler
Year Published 2016
Type of Initiative Article
Country PHILIPPINES
Link http://www.rappler.com/science-nature/environment/120326-agroforestry-intercropping-coconut-farmers-quezon

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Biointensive Agriculture Training Program in Kenya

Content Manor House Agricultural Center provides training in low input farming as an alternative to conventional methods, which are heavily reliant on external inputs. Farmers practicing biointensive farming techniques experience significant yield increases and improved soil fertility and grow more nutritious crops. Since 1984, over 100,000 farmers have received this training, and an estimated 200,000 households now use methods of biointensive agriculture.
Author Oakland Institute
Contributor Oakland Institute
Year Published 2015
Type of Initiative Case Studies
Country KENYA
Link http://tinyurl.com/nceez5f

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Agroforestry to Improve Farm Productivity in Mali

Content A research project on improved fallows examined how short-term rotations of selected perennial tree and shrub species impact cereal yields and soil quality in subsistence maize cropping systems. The effects of improved fallows on maize yields were significant when combining a tree species (Gliricidia) and a nitrogen-fixing legume (Stylosanthes). The results suggest that this innovative agroforestry strategy holds significant promise for enhancing soil fertility, maize yields and food security throughout Mali and sub-Saharan Africa.
Author Oakland Institute
Contributor Oakland Institute
Year Published 2015
Type of Initiative Case Studies
Country MALI
Link http://www.oaklandinstitute.org/sites/oaklandinstitute.org/files/Agroforestry_Mali.pdf

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Agroforesterie pour la sécurité alimentaire au Malawi

Content Le Malawi est confronté à une myriade de problèmes environnementaux, sociaux et sanitaires, y compris l’insécurité alimentaire, la dégradation des terres et la déforestation. Un programme d’agroforesterie promeut la plantation d’arbres pour augmenter les rendements des cultures dans les sols épuisés, lutter contre la déforestation et autonomiser les femmes.
Author Oakland Institute
Contributor Oakland Institute
Year Published 2015
Type of Initiative Case Studies
Country MALAWI
Link http://www.oaklandinstitute.org/sites/oaklandinstitute.org/files/Securite_Alimentare_Malawi.pdf

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Agroforestry for Food Security in Malawi

Content Malawi faces myriad of environmental, social, and human health challenges, including food insecurity, land degradation and deforestation. An agroforestry program promotes tree planting to increase crop yields in previously depleted soils, reverse deforestation, and empower women.
This case study is part of a series of 33 case studies with a focus on Agroeocology produced by the Oakland Institute and co-published with the Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa (AFSA).

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Author Oakland Institute
Contributor Oakland Institute
Year Published 2015
Type of Initiative Case Studies
Country MALAWI
Link http://www.oaklandinstitute.org/sites/oaklandinstitute.org/files/Food_Security_Malawi.pdf

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Agroecology and Water Harvesting in Zimbabwe

Content Since the late 1960s, Zephaniah Phiri Maseko has pioneered a unique, innovative vision for community and agricultural development through judicious water management; his system has been widely adopted across the country, increasing agricultural productivity and resilience in this semi-arid region.
Author Oakland Institute
Contributor Oakland Institute
Year Published 2015
Type of Initiative Case Studies
Country Zimbabwe
Link http://www.oaklandinstitute.org/sites/oaklandinstitute.org/files/Water_Harvesting_Zimbabwe.pdf

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Addressing the Challenges of Food Insecurity and Environmental Degradation in Zambia

Content Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) has helped people address the challenges of food insecurity and environmental degradation while conserving wildlife and other natural resources. COMACO is one of the few programs that operate at the scale of an entire ecosystem—contributing to increased wildlife numbers, better protected habitats, improved food security, and better incomes.

This case study was produced by the Oakland Institute. It is copublished by the Oakland Institute and the Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa AFSA). A full set of case studies can be found at www.oaklandinstitute.org and www.afsafrica.org

Author Oakland Institute
Contributor Oakland Institute
Year Published 2015
Type of Initiative Case Studies
Country ZAMBIA
Link http://www.oaklandinstitute.org/addressing-environmental-degradation

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Bees bring a new buzz to family farming in Zimbabwe

Content One way that family farmers improve their resilience to both climatic and economic shocks is to diversify what is produced. More and different crops and livestock, particularly local varieties and breeds are being promoted. Two other options stand out too – bees and trees. These have the added advantages of complementing the production of agricultural crops and enhancing the agroecosystem. In Zimbabwe, the Ruzivo Trust has been promoting beekeeping, and the results are showing the sweet taste of success. Bees can help farmers break out of poverty.
Author Chipo Gono
Contributor ILEIA
Year Published 2014
Type of Initiative Case Studies
Country Zimbabwe
Link http://www.agriculturesnetwork.org/magazines/global/resilience-faces/diversifying-with-bees-zimbabwe

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Moving from vulnerability to resilience in Africa

Content In August 2012, the Seidu family had to cope with the bad harvest. Like many farming families in northern Ghana, they had to adopt the ‘one-zero-one’ strategy for the children and the ‘zero-zero-one’ strategy for themselves. ‘One’ represents a meal, ‘zero’ is no meal. So during the lean season, their four children had breakfast in the morning, nothing at midday, and a meal in the evening.
Author Peter Gubbels
Contributor ILEIA
Year Published 2014
Type of Initiative Article
Country GHANA
Link http://www.agriculturesnetwork.org/magazines/global/resilience-faces/theme-overview-building-resilience

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Home nurseries: Viable businesses with environmental awareness

Content Butana is a dry plateau in northern Sudan, east of the river Nile. Covering 65,000 square kilometres, less than 10% can be described as ‘woodland’ in the vaguest sense of the word, and even these trees are disappearing rapidly. The Butana Integrated Rural Development Project began in 2008 with the aim of supporting the livelihoods of poor family farmers by strengthening their resilience in the face of recurrent droughts. And improving tree cover was a key means of achieving this.
Author Mohammed El Hassan Ali
Contributor ILEIA
Year Published 2014
Type of Initiative Case Studies
Country SUDAN
Link http://www.agriculturesnetwork.org/magazines/global/resilience-faces/diversifying-with-trees

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