Recently Added Initiatives and Reports

  • Water harvesting: nourishing the land, body and mind

    04_by-Moses-Ndhlovu Bouwas Mawara and his wife Nyengeterai, small scale farmers in the semi-arid Zvishavane district of Zimbabwe, are renowned for their innovation in water harvesting for crop and animal production, and for setting up local structures and systems to spread innovations amongst fellow farmers. Today at least 160 farming families in their community are more resilient in the face of droughts, dry spells and the long dry season.

  • Agroecology and Water Harvesting in Zimbabwe

    water-harvesting-zimbabwe Since the late 1960s, Zephaniah Phiri Maseko has pioneered a unique, innovative vision for community and agricultural development through judicious water management; his system has been widely adopted across the country, increasing agricultural productivity and resilience in this semi-arid region.

  • Addressing the Challenges of Food Insecurity and Environmental Degradation in Zambia

    environment-degradation-zambia Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) has helped people address the challenges of food insecurity and environmental degradation while conserving wildlife and other natural resources. COMACO is one of the few programs that operate at the scale of an entire ecosystem—contributing to increased wildlife numbers, better protected habitats, improved food security, and better incomes. This case study was produced by the Oakland Institute. It is copublished by the Oakland Institute and the Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa AFSA). A full set of case studies can be found at and

  • A technology to drastically save irrigation water

    DSC04131 At the Centre for Environment Concerns, an NGO based in Hyderabad, India, the challenge was clear: develop an inclusive irrigation technology suitable for low rainfall areas. Alongside farmers and female farm labourers, they developed a system that provides assured moisture directly to the plant root zone. Initial trials show two unique benefits: it requires about one fifth of the water needed for drip irrigation and it supports a healthy soil ecosystem. Key to the effectiveness of this technology appears to be the gradual wetting of the soil rather than abrupt provision of water in ‘concentrated’ loads.

  • The páramo, where water is born

    01_A-day-of-communal-labour-in-the-San-Isidro-páramo-repairing-a-section-of-the-community’s-irrigation-water-pipeline_by-Tristan-Partridge San Isidro is an indigenous community in Ecuador’s central Andes that collectively built and manages an irrigation pipeline. The pipeline has brought life back to family farming and created more space for the community to protect the páramo, a source of water and life for farming communities and urban residents alike. This story proves the strength of longstanding models of community organisation allied with the national indigenous movement.

About this site

This web-page has been created by a common effort by many organizations. We want to show the wide range of sustainable agricultural practices, and that peasants and other small scale food producers and providers can nourish a growing population, preserve the environment and contribute substantially to stop the climate change. Read more

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Agricultural Transition

Viable forms of farming exist and evolve in different parts of the world and many transitions are being successful. Read more

Other websites

150 organizations have signed on to the document Rio+20 Time to act. See the list of organizations which have signed on to it, at

Agriculture at a crossroads. Findings & recommendations for future farming. You may visit the website at